bottle feeding

Most moms know that breastfeeding is best for baby and for the moms that decide to breastfeed (it is a choice) there are a lot of great support groups online. Breastfeeding.com provides an online community that helps support moms and Baby Center has many articles for new mothers to help them learn the benefits of breastfeeding and the how-to’s to help moms problem solve. The support and encouragement to breastfeed is certainly more common then it used to be but what about the mothers who do not breastfeed their babies? Is there support and guidance for those mothers on the formula to choose, safe BPA free bottles to use, how to prepare the formula and how much to feed the baby? I am sad to report my findings are showing there’s very little out there.

There is no doubt in my mind that breastfeeding is best for baby and mother but not every mother can breast feed, contrary to popular belief and despite the health benefits, not every mother makes the choice breastfeed and that is a personal choice. Many mothers will say this is not true, “I breastfed and at first had problems at first but I pushed on and it all worked out. You just gave up too soon.”  This is a comment I have listened to over and over and remember  I have facilitated playgroups for mothers and children for close to a year and so I have listened to many conversations! My response is this:  Oh, really, what if I told you that physically I could not breastfeed because I did not make the hormone needed that tells my body to make milk – enough milk that is. What if I told you that I know mothers that breastfed out of guilt and society pressure but that it mentally put them over the edge – how is that good for the baby?

My personal story is this; I tried for three weeks and my son lost weight every week and was not being nourished because I felt so much pressure to continue trying. The lactation counselors said no pacifier and do not supplement with a bottle but my instinct told me this was not right, my son wasn’t eating. I cried and cried, ate more food and drank more water and did everything people told me to do. I followed the advice of everyone and wanted to feel like I was a “good” mom because I was breastfeeding. When it didn’t work out, I cried like I had failed. I cried because I couldn’t do it and must not be a good mother. As Fox News pointed out, the moms who do not breastfeed certainly feel judged but should this really be the case? Shouldn’t moms support one another?

Furedi agrees that, all things being equal, breastfeeding is better for babies than bottle-feeding. But he says moms who chose bottle-feeding for whatever reason should not be intimidated by what others think.

“This is a choice that a woman should make based on her own circumstances. It is not one that society should make for her,” he says.

When I read the article at Totally Her about breastfeeding and being a good mom, I could relate. When I had my daughter, everyone just assumed I would breastfeed but not one nurse asked me. This disturbed me and again I felt pressure to try. I, however, was wiser and more mature and knew that I could not put myself or my child through the stress or pressure again. When I said no to the nurse she pressured me, lecturing me and giving me reading material. When she left the room, I cried. I’m a grown woman and I’m educated and damn it – I’m the mom so back off! I felt so angry that there was all of this pressure but no support to help me make good bottle feeding choices. Instead, I got the “cold” shoulder when I asked questions about baby formula. I was told that they are all the same, no different, bottles too. Except, is this true?

When I researched support groups for moms who do not breastfeed I found an article about how moms that don’t breastfeed are more likely to abuse their children. Okay, that is ridiculous and insane. The research supposedly showed that moms that breastfed are more connected to their children because they release the hormone oxytocin.

“These results make sense biologically because breastfeeding is associated with oxytocin release, and we know from animal studies that oxytocin is produced in the brain and helps activate areas of the brain that are involved in maternal care and behavior”.

There is no doubt that breastfeeding is good for mother and baby but from what I can tell, I’m fine and I was bottle fed and I’m not ashamed (I used to be) to say my two children were bottle fed. I’m for educated decisions and a woman to make their own choice without pressure or guilt. I support woman who breastfeed and woman who don’t. Woman need to support one another and not be so damn judgmental and as much as it I’m proud to see such support, research and guidance for moms that do breastfeed there needs to be equal support to help the moms that do not.

Resources for Bottle Feeding Your Baby:

Pregnancy and Baby

Baby Feeding Choice

Babies Today

Pea in the Pod-Pod Cast

What do you have to lose?


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